Plant used for/Seasoning

From EcoReality

Jump to: navigation, search

Please add more about plants that are used for Seasoning here!

Seasoning
Used to add flavour to food.

For more information

Inventory

Here is EcoReality's seed inventory for plants that are used as Seasoning:

IDcommon namefamilylatin namedatequantityactiondays to germpropagationdays to maturityhabitatsundrainagesoilinventorynotesnutrientsneedsuse
320Basil, Italian Large LeafLamiaceaeOcimum basilicum (dg fo pf wp)2013-06-18 00:00:0060 each starts in greenhouse soiltransplant25Food, Seasoning
239Basil, SweetLamiaceaeOcimum basilicum (dg fo pf wp)2012-04-12 00:00:0050% germ25Certified organic. This variety grows big, mid-green leaves all summer long. Keep picking the growing tips and the two pairs of leaves below them for the kitchen. Sow several times for a continuous supply. Grow one on a warm windowsill through the winter. 450 eachSeasoning
240Basil, Wild perennialLamiaceaeClinopodium vulgare (dg fo pf wp)0 eachSeasoning
238Basil, Red RubinLamiaceaeOcimum basilicum (dg fo pf wp)2012-04-06 00:00:0052 each seeds in plantStart indoors in flats 4-6 weeks before transplanting when possibility of frost has passed and soil has warmed. Can also be direct-seeded into warm garden soil, 1 seed per inch, when chance of frost has passed. During germination, keep entire seedbed evenly moist.

Soil&water

Prefers rich, moist, but well-drained soils. Enrich soil with compost but do not over-fertilize. Water moderately. Mulch to conserve soil moisture and control weeds.
0 gramsThe most consistently deep purple leaves of all the basils I've seen. A fine traditional flavour and aroma, along with beautiful lavender flowers, make this basil an outstanding culinary and ornamental variety. A must for the herb garden, dramatic in the flower bed, and great habitat for pollinators. Seasoning
241DillApiaceaeAnethum graveolens (dg fo pf wp)0 eachSeasoning
21Chameleon Plant; Yu-xing-cao; TsiSaururaceaeHouttoynia cordata (dg fo pf wp)60Sow seed in cool soils of early spring. Mix small seed with sand and sprinkle on surface, then barely cover with soil, tamp down securely and keep evenly moist and in the light until germination, which can take 60 to 90 days. Once seedlings have sized up, individuate to pots and grow out that way until they are large enough to transplant outdoors.Plant prefers moist garden soil in the sun to partial shade. We were able to make it thrive in an unheated greenhouse here in our zone 7 during February (brr.). Easily grown in containers, the plant will spread in open fertile beds.sun or partial shademoist100 eachCreeping herbaceous perennial native to China. Stolons and leaves used as an aromatic and tasty condiment. This plant is very easily grown and will diversify any cuisine. We recommend to market growers, connoisseurs, restaurant owners and inventive householders. The medicine Yu-xing-cao is used to treat infections of the lungs and urinary tract and the herb is efficaciously used in anticancer therapies. This is one of the many plants used by the Chinese to diversify their diets and in so doing to avoid degenerative disease.Food, Fragrance, Seasoning
22ChervilApiaceaeAnthriscus cerefolium (dg fo pf wp)Direct seed in the spring garden. Cutting back regularly and sowing in succession will keep chervil herb coming to the tabvle throughout the season. Very fast to make edible leaf.Prefers a cool, moist location where it will put on a great deal of green herb without bolting.100 eachHardiness: The plant will perform well in any garden in the summertime and is a good winter crop in maritime gardens or in the winter greenhouse, even if the greenhouse is unheated.

Hardy annual native to Europe, growing to about 12 inches and with a mounding habit. Chervil has a reputation of repelling slugs. The plants are petite and the flavor is very fine. It is a gourmet parsley-like plant that is used in seasoning vegetables, meat dishes, omelettes, soups, and for making salad dressing.

This is a culinary herb that is also used as a diuretic and blood-purifier and carminative (digestive agent).

The herb is experiencing a renaissance of popularity, and is very saleable in salad mixes or as a plant in a pot.
Carminative, Diuretic, Insect Repellant, Seasoning
23Cilantro; Coriander; Thai ParsleyApiaceaeCoriandrum sativum (dg fo pf wp)2012-04-07 00:00:00520 each seeds in plantSow directly in the garden bed. Germination can be a bit cranky, so be patient. Sow starting in the early spring, in successions 3 weeks apart, in order to assure ongoing availability of the fresh herb.30Plant prefers full sun and regular garden soil.full sungarden200 eachAnnual. 30 days to cilantro, 60 days to coriander.

Harvest the shining, smooth leaves before the plant flowers for use as the culinary spice Cilantro in cooking and in salsa. Harvest the seeds and use them as Coriander, a curry ingredient and also a respected medicinal herb.

Medicinally, the fresh or dried herb and seeds chelate heavy metals and help move them out of the body—this includes mercury and lead. The seeds are especially stimulant, aromatic and carminative. Combine fresh green coriander seeds with spilanthes buds and extract together in alcohol for a mouthwash experience that surpasses everything with the possible exception of a crisp ripe apple right off the tree. Interestingly, we invented this combination spontaneously and only later found out that coriander helps the body chelate mercury that might be seeping from old fillings.

RECIPE FOR CHELATION SALSA Here’s our recipe for “Chelation Salsa” 2 cups chopped fresh cilantro 2 cups chopped fresh tomato 1 cup chopped fresh basil ½ cup chopped pumpkin seeds 4 cloves garlic, chopped and pressed Hot peppers to taste 1 TBS lemon juice 2 TBS olive oil

Salt to taste
Carminative, Seasoning, Stimulant
28Epazote; WormseedChenopodiaceaeChenopodium ambrosioides (dg fo pf wp)Strew seed on surface of sandy soil and keep moist until germination.Plant prefers full sun and does well in waste ground.full sun100 eachPerennial wormwood-like plant is the source of a potent spice and vermifuge. The dried leaf is traditionally mixed in bean dishes, a tasty practice that also allays flatus. In sufficient dosage, and especially if the seeds are taken by themselves, the plant will aid in expulsion of intestinal worms.Calcium, Manganese, Nitrogen, Phosphorous, PotassiumCarminative, Seasoning
37Horehound, WhiteLamiaceaeMarrubium vulgare (dg fo pf wp)2013-04-30 00:00:00208 each seeds in plantScarify seeds and sow in early spring, directly in the garden or in pots. Space about 1 foot apart -- they are somewhat diminutive and will grow only about as tall as your knees.Plant prefers full sun and dryish, nutrient depleted soils. This is a plant that can literally be killed with love, so allow it to grow on the margins of the garden where water and nutrients grow thin.full sunwell drained50 eachHerbaceous perennial native to the American SW and hardy to 10 degrees F. The tea or decoction are traditionally used for treating the common cold and especially coughs -- a strong tea will knock almost anything out of your system. If you boil down the tea or decoction, then you end up with a syrupy substance (the soft extract) that can be combined with an equal amount of melted sugar and made into cough lozenges.Expectorant, Seasoning
55Mugwort, Western; White SagebrushAsteraceaeArtemisia ludoviciana (dg fo pf wp)2013-04-27 00:00:00300 each seeds in plant7Sow in spring. Press hard into surface and keep moist until germ. Germination note on this seed: My trials showed a very high rate of germination (no, I didn't try to count those little specks -- what do you think, I have the eyes of a 20 year old? At this age, you learn to trust intuition more than vision...) in 7 days at 65 degrees F. Develop quickly from green specks to respectable seedlings. Very excited about having them.Plant prefers full sun to part shade and will thrive in dry, depleted soils.sun or partial shadewell drainedPatch-forming herbaceous perennial native to western and central US.The softly silvery-white and aromatic leaves give rise to dangling flowers of yellow. Used extensively by the Native Americans and currently much valued by local herbalists in the form of tea, spice, poultice and snuff. The plant is astringent, deodorant and very friendly to the touch—used in treating eczema, spider bite, stomachache, and menstrual woes.Astringent, Seasoning
93Onion, Ailsa CraigAlliaceaeAllium cepa (dg fo pf wp)2012-04-04 00:00:00120 each seeds in plant5Start indoors in February to mid-March, and transplant in April. Overwintering onions need to be started in early July, and transplanted by the middle of August, and will be ready in June. Scallions can be direct sown every 3 weeks from April to late August. Optimal soil temperature for germination: 21-25°C (70-75°F). Seeds will emerge in 6-12 days, depending on conditions.

Transplants are preferred for home gardeners. Sow 3 seeds 5mm-1cm (¼-½") deep in each cell of a 72-cell tray. Transplant as a clump, spacing each 12-15cm (5-6") apart in rows 45-75cm (18-30") apart. Scallions can be spaced at 2-5cm (1-2") apart in rows 15cm (6") apart.

In optimal conditions at least 75% of seeds should germinate. Usual seed life: 1 year. Per 100' row: 260 seeds (scallions 1.2M), per acre: 76M seeds (scallions 1,045M).
95Ideal pH: 5.5-6.5 (6.0-6.8 for scallions). Fertile and well-drained soil in full sun is essential. Add well-rotted compost and dig ½-1 cup copmlete organic fertilizer into the soil beneath each 3m (10') of row. Keep moisture high in the top 20-30cm (8-12") of soil. Most of the bulb should form on the surface of the soil, so don't transplant too deeply. Bulb size is dependent on the size of the tops: the bigger the tops, the bigger the bulb. Provide August-planted scallions with the frost protection of a cloche or heavy row cover by the end of October. Stop watering in the beginning of August to mature the bulbs in dry soil. After half the tops have fallen, push over the remainder, wait a week and lift the bulbs. Curing is essential for long storage. Spread bulbs out in the sun for about a week, covering them at night to protect from dew. When the outer layer of the onion changes from moist to dry and crisp, it is cured. If weather is poor, cure inside. Storage: Keep onions in mesh sacks or hang in braids so they get good ventilation, and hang sacks where air is dry and very cool, but not freezing. Check them regularly and remove any sprouting or rotting onions. Well-cured storage onions should keep until late spring.full sunmoistsandy5 gramsHuge, straw-yellow globes up to 20cm (8") in diameter! Firm, with mild, sweet flesh, Ailsa is a fairly good storer. Fine textured, excellent for salads and sandwiches. A customer favourite!

Choose sweet onion varieties for enjoying raw or cooked within a couple of months of harvest. Storage types keep much longer, and will last until the follwoing spring in the right conditions. All onions are photoperiodic - day length triggers bulbing. Our varieties are all "long day" types, suitable for northern US and Canada.

Botrytis blast and downy mildew are common leaf diseases. One starts with white spots and streaks, the other with purple-grey areas on leaves. Leaves wither from the top down and plants die prematurely. Separate the overwintered and spring crops because disease starts in older plants and moves to younger. Avoid overhead watering and plant in open sunny locations. Use lots of compost and practice strict sanitation and rotation procedures. Spraying with copper hydroxide every 7-14 days at the first sign of a problem may help prevent disease from spreading.

The pungent odour of onions repels many pests and also protects nearby garden vegetables.
Food, Seasoning
94Onion, RedwingAlliaceaeAllium cepa (dg fo pf wp)2012-04-03 00:00:00200 each seeds in plant5Start indoors in February to mid-March, and transplant in April. Overwintering onions need to be started in early July, and transplanted by the middle of August, and will be ready in June. Scallions can be direct sown every 3 weeks from April to late August. Optimal soil temperature for germination: 21-25°C (70-75°F). Seeds will emerge in 6-12 days, depending on conditions.

Transplants are preferred for home gardeners. Sow 3 seeds 5mm-1cm (¼-½") deep in each cell of a 72-cell tray. Transplant as a clump, spacing each 12-15cm (5-6") apart in rows 45-75cm (18-30") apart. Scallions can be spaced at 2-5cm (1-2") apart in rows 15cm (6") apart.

In optimal conditions at least 75% of seeds should germinate. Usual seed life: 1 year. Per 100' row: 260 seeds (scallions 1.2M), per acre: 76M seeds (scallions 1,045M).
110Ideal pH: 5.5-6.5 (6.0-6.8 for scallions). Fertile and well-drained soil in full sun is essential. Add well-rotted compost and dig ½-1 cup copmlete organic fertilizer into the soil beneath each 3m (10') of row. Keep moisture high in the top 20-30cm (8-12") of soil. Most of the bulb should form on the surface of the soil, so don't transplant too deeply. Bulb size is dependent on the size of the tops: the bigger the tops, the bigger the bulb. Provide August-planted scallions with the frost protection of a cloche or heavy row cover by the end of October.full sunwell drainedrich150 eachThe ultimate in a red-skinned storage onion, this one stores nearly as well as Copra. Redwing produces globe-shaped bulbs 7-10cm (3-4") across, with unique deep-red, glossy skins and strong tops. Red onions are milder than yellow ones.

Choose sweet onion varieties for enjoying raw or cooked within a couple of months of harvest. Storage types keep much longer, and will last until the follwoing spring in the right conditions. All onions are photoperiodic - day length triggers bulbing. Our varieties are all "long day" types, suitable for northern US and Canada.

Stop watering in the beginning of August to mature the bulbs in dry soil. After half the tops have fallen, push over the remainder, wait a week and lift the bulbs. Curing is essential for long storage. Spread bulbs out in the sun for about a week, covering them at night to protect from dew. When the outer layer of the onion changes from moist to dry and crisp, it is cured. If weather is poor, cure inside. Storage: Keep onions in mesh sacks or hang in braids so they get good ventilation, and hang sacks where air is dry and very cool, but not freezing. Check them regularly and remove any sprouting or rotting onions. Well-cured storage onions should keep until late spring.

Botrytis blast and downy mildew are common leaf diseases. One starts with white spots and streaks, the other with purple-grey areas on leaves. Leaves wither from the top down and plants die prematurely. Separate the overwintered and spring crops because disease starts in older plants and moves to younger. Avoid overhead watering and plant in open sunny locations. Use lots of compost and practice strict sanitation and rotation procedures. Spraying with copper hydroxide every 7-14 days at the first sign of a problem may help prevent disease from spreading.

The pungent odour of onions repels many pests and also protects nearby garden vegetables.
Food, Seasoning
57Pepper, African Bird; Pilipili Hoho; Pilipili Kichaa; African Bird Peppers; Birdseye Pepper; Pequin; Piquin; PenguinSolanaceaeCapsicum frutescens (dg fo pf wp)8Start indoors 40 to 50 days prior to the last frost. Thin seedlings to at least 2 inches apart in the flat. Transplant out to garden after the soil has really warmed up. We grow ours in a cloche even in the summer, as cold nights can set them back. The best compost for peppers is higher in phosphorous than nitrogen. Kelp is well-tolerated and makes for outrageous yields.170Peppers prefer a scanty, even water supply, good drainage, full sun, and a long, hot summer. Excellent choice for greenhouse pepper growers or folks growing peppers in the South or Gulf States, as well as in the tropics.full sunwell drained180,000 Scoville Heat Units. Perennial bush pepper. 170 days to maturity, best yields in the second year. These are grown by us on our farm here in Southern Oregon, the culmination of a long learning in the subject of African peppers. The plant itself is comely, 4 feet tall and with a flat top, leaves light green. Peppers are tiny, fiery hot, thin-skinned and easily dried, green at first, turning bright red at maturity (see pictures).

One of the primary reasons for my last trip to Zanzibar was to find a reputable and viable source of "bird peppers." These peppers find their way into local cuisine, to flavor samosas and curries, and they are used worldwide for making sauces, vinegars and medicinal compounds. The flavor is citrusy, smoky, and nutty (if you can get past the incredible hotness of them). Clearly, one way to get past the hotness and appreciate these peppers is to use them sparingly in cuisine -- a little goes a long way!

Medicinally, bird peppers are potently anticarcinogenic, warming, carminative, digestive, and stimulating. Tiny, fiery hot, thin-skinned and easily dried.
Carminative, Ornamental, Seasoning, Stimulant
58Pepper, Criolla SellaSolanaceaeCapsicum baccatum (dg fo pf wp)2012-04-05 00:00:0054 each seeds in plant8Easy to germ in cool soils.Criolla Sella is highly adaptable to northern temperate gardens and resistant to viral pathogens.50 eachThe plants are short and sturdy, studded copiously with the golden-orange, thin-skinned peppers. These are not too hot, and they have a very citrusy taste. We eat them fresh, squeezed between the layers that make up our summer sandwiches, cut them into salsa, or dry and grind them up into chili powder. Since Criolla matures before other peppers, even here in our mountain farm where the nights are cool, we prefer this variety over all others. Besides, the taste is phenomenal and the heat units are low enough to allow consumption of many without after effects except perhaps a warm glow down below!Food, Seasoning
59Pepper, JalapenoSolanaceaeCapsicum annuum (dg fo pf wp)2012-04-01 00:00:00190 each seeds in plant80 eachJalapenos are easy to grow and the load of fruit on the compact bushes is really a bit absurdly large for the size of the plant. The word "overloaded" comes to mind. The fruits are thick-skinned and blunt, fat even, and are best used for pickling and for making chile. They are pretty hot, but not fiery hot. They can be harvested green or allowed to ripen to a bright red.Food, Seasoning
261Pepper, Xiao-mi-la; Chinese Chile PepperSolanaceaeCapsicum frutescens (dg fo pf wp)2012-04-05 00:00:0028 each seeds in plant8Start peppers indoors about 6 weeks before planting outdoors. Don't let the seedlings crowd -- thin to the best individuals and work them up in pots for maximum size at transplant. When they get about a foot tall, stake them so they don't fall over. But these are pretty stout and staking is not a big deal. Peppers like frequent, shallow watering and they do well with compost and especially seaweed applications such as kelp. Very fast-draining soils are preferred, and full sun of course. Wait until they go red to harvest them, then dry slowly on a screen, turning daily. After they are fully dry, you can grind them up or put them in a jar for later use.120full sunwell drainedrich50 eachScoville ~90,000 Open-pollinated cultivar. Matures in 120 days. I remember sweating in a restaurant in Kunming, as every dish was garnished or imbedded with chilis that looked just like these. This is probably the most popular chili to use in Chinese cuisine, as it is smallish (a little smaller than a cayenne), pleasantly hot, very very red, easy to grow. The bush is stout and small-leaved, giving rise to upright clusters, fingerlike, blunt, of peppers, not curved, resplendent, prettier than an emperor and tasty. I found these to be quite tolerant of our cold nights and very high yielding -- we'll have peppers galore this winter. Or pepper skins, to be exact. The seeds are now dried and they are a very rich yellow, 100% organic from our farm to your's. May the peppers garland your tables in yummy warmness.Food, Seasoning

You can search for all plants that

are in a particular family
Agavaceae, Aizoaceae, Alliaceae, Amaranthaceae, Anacardiaceae, Apiaceae, Apocynaceae, Araliaceae, Asteraceae, Boraginaceae, Brassicaceae, Campanulaceae, Caprifoliaceae, Adaptogen, Alterative, Analgesic, Anaphrodisiac, Anodyne, Anthelmintic, Antibacterial, Anticholesterolemic, Nitrogen, Phosphorous, Zinc
supplies a particular nutrient (dynamic accumulator)
Antioxidants, Boron, Calcium, Carbohydrate, Chromium, Copper, Fat, Fat: Omega-3, Fibre: Non-Soluble, Fibre: Soluble, Folate, Iodine, Iron, Lycopene, Magnesium, Manganese, Niacin, Nitrogen, Retrieved from "http://www.ecoreality.org/wiki/Plant_used_for/Seasoning"

Share your opinion


blog comments powered by Disqus
Views
Personal tools
Get our newsletter!
Name:
Email Address:

disturbance
entry points
how to
help (off site)
site care
Toolbox
This server and other
EcoReality operations
are 100% wind powered.
Powered by Mac OS X Powered by Mac MediaWiki Powered by MariaDB