Product/309

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Contents

Statistics for product #309, sprout, sunflower


Barcode

EAN-13 barcode used for retail point-of-sale scanners.

barcode

Production

Harvester by Year

IDHarvester20072008200920102011201220132014201520162017201820192020TotalUnits
431Re, Kate1.171.17kilograms
432Frisbie, Josh0.840.84kilograms
TOTAL:Frisbie, Josh2.012.01kilograms

Harvester Value by Year

IDHarvester20072008200920102011201220132014201520162017201820192020TotalValueHarvests
431Re, Kate$38.31$38.31wholesale2
432Frisbie, Josh$27.50$27.50wholesale1
TOTAL:Frisbie, Josh$65.81$65.81wholesale3

First/Last by Year

YearFirstLastDayskgPer DayHarvestsPer Harvest
2015Jul 29Aug 12152.0100.13430.670

Sales

by Venue

Venue20072008200920102011201220132014201520162017201820192020Total
subscription$65.80$65.80
TOTAL:$65.80$65.80

by Venue, in kilograms

Venue2007200820092010201120122013201420152016201720182019Total
subscription2.0102.010
TOTAL:2.0102.010

Seller by Year

Seller20072008200920102011201220132014201520162017201820192020Total
Co-op, EcoReality$65.80$65.80

Buyer by Year

Seller20072008200920102011201220132014201520162017201820192020Total
Co-op, EcoReality$65.80$65.80

by Market-Week

Week20072008200920102011201220132014201520162017201820192020Total

Information about product #309, Helianthus annuus (dg fo pf wp) , sprout, sunflower

  • Income from this product qualifies for determining property tax farm status.
  • This is a raw agricultural product.
SuperUnitsProfit CentreDescriptionHabitatPropagationHazardsNotes
vegetablekilogramsMarket GardenHorizon Herbs recommends direct-seeding in the spring. Plant a bit close at first, protect from crows, and eat the sprouts. Thin to 2 feet apart.90-100 days to maturity. Generally single-headed although occasionally poly-headed, the plants are sturdy of stem and consistently dark black of seed. The ray flowers are golden yellow.

The seeds are used by Native Americans for dyeing wool and basketry. Imparts a color-fast light purple. Heirloom variety from Hopi Land, an oil, food, and dye plant that has its roots in ancient prehistory. One of the first domesticated plants, archaeological evidence points to the middle archaic period for the first human harboring of sunflower. The black seeded sunflowers are generally considered to be best for oil, while the striped sunflowers are considered to be best for direct consumption. However, I do admit that I ate the germ test! The seeds are very rich in oil. Native americans ground the seeds and boiled, then skimmed the oil. In native culture, vegetable oil is considered one of the most precious of substances. Also, the seeds are very good for eating, and the sprouts are potently delicious and healing to digestive woes.

Please plant Hopi black dye sunflowers -- this heirloom variety is endangered by all the new polyhead sunflowers that are being developed for selling as pretty flowers in farmer's markets. This one is just as pretty, and it is much more useful.

Plantings: First/Last by Year

This statistic is incomplete.

See also

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