Product/378

From MediaWiki

Jump to: navigation, search

Other product statistics:

Other statistics:

A page with all statistics is available.

Contents

Statistics for product #378, wormwood, whole plant

Wormwood leaves, fresh weight

Barcode

EAN-13 barcode used for retail point-of-sale scanners.

barcode

Production

Harvester by Year

IDHarvester20072008200920102011201220132014201520162017201820192020TotalUnits
2Steinman, Jan28.0028.00kilograms
3Rowe, Cleome4.354.35kilograms
TOTAL:Rowe, Cleome4.3528.0032.35kilograms

Harvester Value by Year

IDHarvester20072008200920102011201220132014201520162017201820192020TotalValueHarvests
2Steinman, Jan$462.00$462.00retail1
3Rowe, Cleome$71.69$71.69retail1
TOTAL:Rowe, Cleome$71.69$462.00$533.69retail2

First/Last by Year

YearFirstLastDayskgPer DayHarvestsPer Harvest
2017Oct 1Oct 114.3454.34514.345
2019Aug 15Aug 15128.00028.000128.000

Sales

by Venue

Venue20072008200920102011201220132014201520162017201820192020Total

by Venue, in kilograms

Venue2007200820092010201120122013201420152016201720182019Total

Seller by Year

Seller20072008200920102011201220132014201520162017201820192020Total

Buyer by Year

Seller20072008200920102011201220132014201520162017201820192020Total

by Market-Week

Week20072008200920102011201220132014201520162017201820192020Total

Information about product #378, Artemisia absinthium (dg fo pf wp) , wormwood, whole plant

  • Income from this product qualifies for determining property tax farm status.
  • This is a value added product.
SuperUnitsProfit CentreDescriptionHabitatPropagationHazardsNotes
value added productskilogramsMedicinal HerbsWormwood leaves, fresh weightSeed: surface sow from late winter to early summer in a greenhouse. The seed usually germinates within 2 - 26 weeks at 15°c[134]. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots. They can be planted out in the summer, or kept in pots in a cold frame for the winter and then planted out in the spring.

Cuttings: half-ripe wood, July/August in a frame.

Division: in spring or autumn.

Succeeds in any soil, but best in poor, dry, warm soil, which also promotes longevity and aroma.
The plant is poisonous if used in large quantities[20, 61]. Even small quantities have been known to cause nervous disorders, convulsions, insomnia etc[222]. Just the scent of the plant has been known to cause headaches and nervousness in some people[169]. The plant contains thujone. In small quantities this acts as a brain stimulant but is toxic in excess[254]. Avoid if prone to seizures. Avoid during pregnancy & breast feeding. Absinthism adverse effects include hallucinations, insomnia, loss of intellect, psychosis, tremor & seizures [301].Inhibits growth of fennel, sage, caraway, anise, and most young plants, especially in wet years [14, 18, 20].

Good companion to carrots, protecting them from root fly[201].

Deerproof, attracts dogs.

Fresh or dried shoots repel insects and mice. An infusion discourages slugs and insects.

Valued especially for its tonic effect on the liver, gallbladder and digestive system, and for its vermicidal activity[4, 238, 254].

Extremely useful medicine for those with weak and under-active digestion. It increases stomach acid and bile production, improving digestion and the absorption of nutrients[254]. It also eases wind and bloating and, if taken regularly, helps the body return to full vitality after a prolonged illness[254].

The leaves and flowering shoots are anthelmintic, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antitumor, carminative, cholagogue, emmenagogue, febrifuge, hypnotic, stimulant, stomachic, tonic and vermifuge[4, 9, 21, 46, 165, 222, 254].

Harvested as it is coming into flower and then dried for later use[4]. Use with caution[21], the plant should be taken internally in small doses for short-term treatment only, preferably under the supervision of a qualified practitioner[238]. It should not be prescribed for children or pregnant women[238].

The extremely bitter leaves are chewed to stimulate the appetite[222]. The bitter taste on the tongue sets off a reflex action, stimulating stomach and other digestive secretions[254].

Leaves have been used with some success in the treatment of anorexia nervosa[244].

Applied externally to bruises and bites[238]. A warm compress has been used to ease sprains and strained muscles[257].

A homeopathic remedy is made from the leaves[9]. It is used to stimulate bile and gastric juice production and to treat disorders of the liver and gall bladder[9].

Plantings: First/Last by Year

This statistic is incomplete.

See also

Share your opinion


blog comments powered by Disqus
Personal tools
Get our newsletter!
Name:
Email Address:

disturbance
entry points
help (off site)
Environmental jobs, green volunteering, good work! Powered by the wind! This server and other
EcoReality operations
are 100% wind powered.
Powered by Mac OS X Powered by Mac MediaWiki Powered by MariaDB Powered by Valentina Studio Pro